Author Interview with Jack Price and Home

Hello, my name is Jack Price and I am a 22 year old, English, writer, director and filmmaker.

I have recently completed a degree in English Literature and Drama alongside writing and releasing my debut novella ‘Home’ on Kindle which, much to my surprise and delight, rose to number 1 in the UK free psychological fiction chart during its promotional run. I started creatively in the theatre, acting, writing, and directing in high school, as I got older I started writing more prose before eventually moving into filmmaking, which I still do regularly through making music videos with Park Bench Productions.

My work usually finds itself landing in the psychological horror genre and I enjoy reading, watching and creating high concept pieces of work that allow and encourage the audience to have to make some decisions for themselves. I’m currently working on writing my debut short film ‘Hostel Dice’ which I will direct this summer for release later on in the year and a science fiction watercolour comic book.

You can reach me on Twitter, InstagramFacebook and my BookHippo profile.

Have you always wanted to be a writer?

I wanted to be a rugby player when I was growing up, and I spent a lot of time training, playing and travelling. I was really fortunate to get to travel around the world to places like America and South Africa while I was playing so I had a lot of great experiences. After that, I wanted to be an Epidemiologist and studied the sciences alongside the arts, before finally realising that it was the storytelling that I was allowed to pursue in English and Drama that I was really passionate about and wanted to carry on developing in the future.

Tell us about your book, and the story behind writing it.

‘Home’ follows the life of Nathan Arnold, a man who is constantly ailed by pains and illness. Despite the doctors not being able to find anything physically wrong with him Nathan refuses to believe that his ailments are psychological. When he returns home to be closer to his dying mother, a strong believer in the paranormal, he finds himself in the centre of a set of bloody serial killings and has to decide whether it is his scepticism in the medical opinions or scepticism in the paranormal that wins out as he faces his predicament and personal problems head on. Belief and scepticism are the driving forces behind the story. I wrote a draft version of the first chapter before Christmas of last year didn’t write any more until February of the following year. In the interim, I assistant directed and designed and ran VFX for a stage production of Mike Bartlett’s ‘13’, which contains an assessment and commentary on the belief that most probably provoked my own considerations of the subject and inspired me to carry on with the story. The characters and chapter seemed to be the perfect start point for a look into the theme.

What’s the biggest challenge about being a writer?

For me personally, it’s time management. Working on multiple creative fronts alongside my academic work doesn’t always leave a great deal of time in the schedule. But it’s always great fun having to apply myself to numerous different disciplines and I think it benefits me across the board as I can apply the skills I learn from one style to the others and vice versa.

Do you have a specific writing space?

My bedroom is setup with everything I might need to create any idea I might have as soon as I have it. But I like to keep a pen and paper on me at all times at the very least just in case. I recently bought myself a portable typewriter which has helped me write on the move as I have always felt like writing on a screen separates me from the story too much.

What’s your number one piece of writing advice?

Take your time, make sure you enjoy the process. It’s the best bit.

What books do you currently have on your bedside table?

The complete works of Shakespeare and H.P Lovecraft, and a couple of Steve Ditko drawn Doctor Strange comics. Ditko is my favourite marvel artist, his style is so unique.

Who have been your biggest writing influences and why?

Stephen King. He is the undisputed King of horror and has given the genre such a great platform in contemporary society. His characterisation and development of place are usually flawless in my opinion, and I don’t think you can write anything with any kind of horror influence in the modern day without being influenced by him in one way or another. Kafka has also been a big influence on my writing. I love how dreamy and abstract he can be while still maintaining such a solid grip on characterisation and plot.

How do you market your writing?

So far I have used social media and the immense power of the internet. Online marketing and ebook publishing has changed the game completely and made it so easy to get your stories out there without needing a huge budget or team of people to make it happen. You just have to be willing to put the extra effort into making it happen.

Lastly, something fun. What’s something our readers might not know about you?

I am hopelessly addicted to the computer game Football Manager and I have been for most of my life. I’ve racked up 1000’s of hours of playtime over the various editions on my steam account and those only accounts for the last few years so who knows what my lifetime total is. I find it incredibly relaxing for some reason and by this point, I’m completely convinced that if I wasn’t writing and making films I could manage a football team successfully.


Home

by: Jack Price

Nathan Arnold is a perfectly healthy 22 year old man, whose life is constantly hindered by debilitating by illnesses and pain’s. The doctors cannot find anything physically wrong with him and he refuses to believe that it is all psychological. Returning home to be closer to his sick mother the truth about both Nathan’s condition and painful past is discovered as a series of bloody murders stalk him down memory lane. Sceptic or believer, innocent or guilty, the lines are blurred as the reader and protagonist are invited to make a choice.

About the Author

Scott Mullins is a freelance writer and digital content manager. When he’s not finding ways to distract himself from writing his novel he writes killer copy for companies all over the world. Connect with Scott on Twitter @ScottMullins86 or LinkedIn. He’s always looking to connect with other writers.